Je me souviens – I remember

Photo prise le 9 mars 1945

RCAF 425 Les Alouettes II

March 9, 1945.

We are at Tholthope.

Yetta, is an old reliable aircraft of the Alouette Squadron overseas, and is still going strong after 75 operations. A D.F.C.has been awarded by the ground crew.

The ground crews are from left to right:

First row:

LAC Paul Crevier, Montreal (2077 Dorion St.),
Sgt. Georges de Montigny, East Angus, P.Q.,
WO1 J.J. Deslauriers, of Montreal (Chambord St.),
Sgt. J.W. Desrosiers, St. Thomas, Ont. (15 Barwick)
LAC J.H. Prince, St. Boniface, Man. (378 Desautels St.)

Left to right on the stand:
LAC A.A. Goshgarian, of Galt, Ont. (27 McNaughton St.),
LAC Marcel Charbonneau, of Lévis (4 Botrel St.),
LAC Y Rouleau, of Montreal (6838 Chambord St.),
LAC Henri Benoit of Montreal (614 Louvain Ave.),
Cpl. Paul S. Clouthier of Vancouver, BC (2211 W. 10th Ave.),
LAC Marcel Renaud, of Montreal (10110 Lille St.)

This aircraft has completes all these sorties since the invasion…

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My visit to Bromptonville’s War Memorial

My visit to Bromptonville’s War Memorial

I never thought I would meet Wilbrod Nadeau there last November.

As usual I took pictures. It was not the first time I had visited Marcel Bergeron, and not the first time we had visited the memorial.

I have learned a lot about World War Two  since 2009 when I started writing about it, first with the sinking of HMCS Athabaskan G07. I simply got curious when my wife’s uncle dropped that name in a family reunion. I could never be 100% sure he was aboard that ship, but I don’t see why he would make up such a story with enough details only a sailor aboard that ship would know.

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Getting back to Wilbrod Nadeau…

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This is a picture of the Bromptonville War Memorial.

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Wilbrod Nadeau’s name is on it. His surname is Brunelle on the memorial. Wilbrod Nadeau was an orphan. His father died in the 1920s and his mother died of apprendicitis in the 1930s. I believe some children were adopted by the Brunelle family. I’m sure Wilbrod Nadeau was adopted by the Brunelles because Marcel Bergeron told me so.

2016

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2010

 

Un banal accident?

On sait maintenant ce qui s’est passé le 6 mai 1944 au-dessus de Bangor-is-y-Coed dans le Flintshire au pays de Galles.

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Wilbrod pilotait un Spitfire. Le rapport parle d’un Spitfire Mk V et une autre source parle d’un Spitfire Mk Ia.

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Spitfire Mk Ia

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Spitfire Mk V

Source de ces dessins

C’est ici dans le cimetière de Chester que le Warrant Officer Second Class Wilbrod Nadeau repose en paix depuis 1944.

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Avec la permission de Stanley Murphy

Vingt-quatre ans, c’est jeune pour mourir.

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Wilbrod Nadeau (1919-1944)

Wilbrod Nadeau est un autre de ces oubliés de l’histoire de la Deuxième Guerre mondiale. Il est né à Weedon le 25 septembre 1919. Weedon, c’est là que Tibé Gagnon est né justement.

Eugène Gagnon - portrait quand il était un cadet de l'air

Eugène Gagnon DFC (1921-1947)

Pourquoi tant écrire sur des inconnus qui ont combattu durant la Deuxième Guerre mondiale? Peut-être parce qu’on a beaucoup trop écrit sur d’autres qui ne méritaient pas autant d’éloges.

Eugène Gagnon s’est illustré durant le Deuxième Guerre mondiale avec ses 33 missions de nuit sur Mosquito. Il a été décoré de la DFC.

Eugene Gagnon 1945

On ne peut en dire autant de Joseph Irénée Wilbrod Alarie Nadeau qui n’a jamais fait de missions, mais ça ne me dérange guère de vous parler…

Le sort de Wilbrod Nadeau en a aussi intéressé d’autres.

May 6th 1944, “During the flying two aircraft from Montford Bridge, Spitfire R6602, pilot F/O Mare George Rivet (J25402) Royal Canadian Air Force, and Spitfire X4821, pilot R135189 W/O Joseph Irenee Wilbrod Nadeau, Royal Canadian Air Force, collided at 12,000ft while engaged in battle formation. F/O Rivet baled out successfully, but W/O Nadeau went down with his aircraft was killed.”

    Alan Clark

    Peak District Air Accident Research

    http://www.peakdistrictaircrashes.co.uk/

Mark,
I was researching J.W.Nadeau when I stumbled on this post. Recently came across some wreckage on the side of a small mountain in Quebec and subsequent investigation determined that it was the remains of a Harvard trainer that suffered Class A damage December 23,1942 while on a training flight out of St. Hubert. Nadeau was the Pupil Pilot, walked away without injury. Flying Officer J.R. Cronk, J13469 was the Instructor, slightly injured. I was curious about what happened to these two and this post has supplied me with part of the answer. I’ve found nothing on Cronk.

Derek.

***

Wilbrod Nadeau, je l’ai croisé cet automne en allant voir Marcel Bergeron à Bromptonville. Marcel m’a dit vendredi dernier qu’il avait bien connu Wilbrod Nadeau tout comme son frère Robert. Marcel m’a même dit que Robert était plus petit que Wilbrod. Je lui ai répliqué que Wilbrod faisait 5 pieds 3…

Vous êtes curieux ou curieuse d’en apprendre plus n’est-ce pas? Moi c’est la curiosité qui m’anime depuis 2009 sur Souvenirs de guerre.

On se repogne avec mon 657e billet sur Souvenirs de guerre

Si vous trouvez que j’écris trop sur le devoir de mémoire, allez visiter ce site.

A Freak Accident?

We now know what happened on May 6th, 1944 over Bangor-is-y-Coed in Flintshire County in Wales.

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Warrant Officer Second Class Wilbrod Nadeau was flying a Spitfire. The report says he was flying a Spitfire Mk V, but another source says it was a Spitfire Mk Ia.

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Spitfire Mk Ia

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Spitfire Mk V

Source of drawings

This is Chester Cemetery where Warrant Officer Second Class Wilbrod Nadeau has been resting in peace since 1944 far from his family in Quebec.

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Courtesy Stanley Murphy

Wilbrod was 24 years-old. That’s much too young to die.

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Wilbrod Nadeau (1919-1944)

Wilbrod Nadeau is another young man who history books written about World War Two forgot. Wilbrod was born in Weedon on September 25th, 1919. Weedon, in the province of Quebec, was the same little town where Tibé Gagnon was born.

Eugène Gagnon - portrait quand il était un cadet de l'air

Eugène Gagnon DFC (1921-1947)

Why have I been writing so much since 2009 about strangers who fought in World War Two? Maybe because others have written so much about some who did so little in the war and don’t deserve that much recognition after all.

Eugène Gagnon flew 33 night operations on a Mosquito over German airfields, and received a DFC in 1945.

Eugene Gagnon 1945

Eugene survived the war, but died in a plane crash on October 21st, 1947.

Eugene Gagnon crash

Joseph Irénée Wilbrod Alarie Nadeau never flew on an operation. He never had the chance to do so, but that’s beside the point isn’t?…

I found out that what happened to Wilbrod Nadeau got some people curious also.


May 6th 1944, “During the flying two aircraft from Montford Bridge, Spitfire R6602, pilot F/O Mare George Rivet (J25402) Royal Canadian Air Force, and Spitfire X4821, pilot R135189 W/O Joseph Irenee Wilbrod Nadeau, Royal Canadian Air Force, collided at 12,000ft while engaged in battle formation. F/O Rivet baled out successfully, but W/O Nadeau went down with his aircraft was killed.”

Alan Clark

Peak District Air Accident Research

http://www.peakdistrictaircrashes.co.uk/


 

Mark,
I was researching J.W.Nadeau when I stumbled on this post. Recently came across some wreckage on the side of a small mountain in Quebec and subsequent investigation determined that it was the remains of a Harvard trainer that suffered Class A damage December 23,1942 while on a training flight out of St. Hubert. Nadeau was the Pupil Pilot, walked away without injury. Flying Officer J.R. Cronk, J13469 was the Instructor, slightly injured. I was curious about what happened to these two and this post has supplied me with part of the answer. I’ve found nothing on Cronk.

Derek.

***

Without knowing it, I crossed path with Wilbrod Nadeau last October when I went to see Marcel Bergeron in Bromptonville. Marcel told me last Friday that he knew Wilbrod Nadeau and his brother Robert. Marcel even told me Robert was smaller than Wilbrod. To this I quicky answered back that Wilbrod was 5 foot 3…

If you are curious to learn more about Wilbrod Nadeau, then stay tuned. Being curious is what led me in 2009 to start writing this blog Souvenirs de guerre.

I will be seeing you next time with my 657th post. If you think I write too much about whom history forgot, then pay a little visit to this Website.

Marcel Bergeron’s Duty to Remember

I phoned Marcel Bergeron Friday night to talk about Wilbrod Nadeau who I had called Wilfrid on my blog on November 11th, 2010.

I should have double-checked what I had written back then…

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Wilbrod! not Wilfrid… I told you Wilbrod!

Marcel was not angry. He just has a quick wit and a dry sense of humour. I have to say I am a bit like Marcel when we start remembering how we met in 2010.

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Marcel was the one who led me to write about Tibé Gagnon in 2010.

Eugène Gagnon

I created a blog especially for Eugene who was with RAF 23 Squadron.

Together with Jacques Gagnon, who is Eugène Gagnon’s nephew, we had honored his uncle who died in a plane crash on October 21, 1947. We did so through my blogs for almost 6 years until finally Eugene Gagnon was honored on November 11th, 2016 by the National Assembly of Quebec and the Société St-Jean-Baptiste de Montréal.

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Invitation of the SSJB of Montréal

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Medal which Jacques Gagnon is holding

When people listened to the presentation we could hear how people were impressed by Eugene’s 33 operations over Germany in the dark of night over German airfields.

Getting back to Wilbrod, I finally found a lot of information on the crash.

May 6th 1944, “During the flying two aircraft from Montford Bridge, Spitfire R6602, pilot F/O Mare George Rivet (J25402) Royal Canadian Air Force, and Spitfire X4821, pilot R135189 W/O Joseph Irenee Wilbrod Nadeau, Royal Canadian Air Force, collided at 12,000ft while engaged in battle formation. F/O Rivet baled out successfully, but W/O Nadeau went down with his aircraft was killed.”

Alan Clark

Peak District Air Accident Research

http://www.peakdistrictaircrashes.co.uk/

***

Mark,
I was researching J.W.Nadeau when I stumbled on this post. Recently came across some wreckage on the side of a small mountain in Quebec and subsequent investigation determined that it was the remains of a Harvard trainer that suffered Class A damage December 23,1942 while on a training flight out of St. Hubert. Nadeau was the Pupil Pilot, walked away without injury. Flying Officer J.R. Cronk, J13469 was the Instructor, slightly injured. I was curious about what happened to these two and this post has supplied me with part of the answer. I’ve found nothing on Cronk.

Derek.

As Marcel always says after our phone conversations…

marcel-bergeron

On se repogne!*

* On se repogne! could be translated by we’ll get together again.

Le devoir de mémoire de Marcel Bergeron

J’ai appelé Marcel vendredi soir pour lui parler de Wilbrod Nadeau, celui que j’avais appelé Wilfrid sur mon blogue le 11 novembre 2010.

J’aurais dû me relire…

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Wilbrod! pas Wilfrid… Je t’ai dit Wilbrod!

Marcel n’était pas fâché après moi. Il est juste un pince-sans-rire*. Il faut dire aussi que je ne laisse pas ma place quand Marcel et moi on se rappelle nos souvenirs de guerre en 2010.

plaque souvenir de Marcel

C’est Marcel qui m’avait fait connaître Tibé Gagnon en 2010.

Ensemble, avec Jacques Gagnon, le neveu d’Eugène, nous avons honoré seuls sa mémoire pendant près de six ans pour finalement le voir honorer le 11 novembre 2016 par l’Assemblée nationale du Québec.

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Invitation de la SSJB de Montréal

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Médaille tenue par Jacques Gagnon

Pour revenir sur Wilbrod, j’ai finalement trouvé dans un forum plein d’information sur le crash.

May 6th 1944, “During the flying two aircraft from Montford Bridge, Spitfire R6602, pilot F/O Mare George Rivet (J25402) Royal Canadian Air Force, and Spitfire X4821, pilot R135189 W/O Joseph Irenee Wilbrod Nadeau, Royal Canadian Air Force, collided at 12,000ft while engaged in battle formation. F/O Rivet baled out successfully, but W/O Nadeau went down with his aircraft was killed.”

Alan Clark

Peak District Air Accident Research

http://www.peakdistrictaircrashes.co.uk/

***

Mark,
I was researching J.W.Nadeau when I stumbled on this post. Recently came across some wreckage on the side of a small mountain in Quebec and subsequent investigation determined that it was the remains of a Harvard trainer that suffered Class A damage December 23,1942 while on a training flight out of St. Hubert. Nadeau was the Pupil Pilot, walked away without injury. Flying Officer J.R. Cronk, J13469 was the Instructor, slightly injured. I was curious about what happened to these two and this post has supplied me with part of the answer. I’ve found nothing on Cronk.

Derek.

Comme me dit souvent Marcel…

marcel-bergeron

On se repogne!

* L’humour pince-sans-rire est une forme particulière d’humour, caractérisée notamment par l’air sérieux de la personne qui en fait preuve. Ce genre d’humour tient de l’ironie. Il est parfois difficile de déterminer si une personne fait ou non de l’ironie ou si elle est sérieuse, ce qui peut entraîner des quiproquos.