Bagpipes that make it rain

A certain synchronicity of time between what is happening now on the Old Continent and St. Patrick’s Day prompted me to submit this piece to Souvenirs de guerre. Although St. Patrick’s Day is not the Scottish holiday, which is St. Andrew’s Day, due to Celtic immigration and historical events, it has become so traditional in North America to hear Scottish pipers that no one has any problem with it. Besides, aren’t Ireland and Scotland both Celtic countries?

Among the cities on this continent with a historic parade for this holiday, Montreal has been at the top of the list for over a century and a half. However, in the pervasive gaiety of the popular « Parade », Montrealers attach a very special meaning to it: that of the imminent and long-awaited arrival of spring.

The following, which is a true story, began on a distant day in my childhood, in 1964 or 1965, when I was less than 10 years old. Just as I had been introduced to Quebec’s St. Jean Baptiste Day, I had also been introduced to the St. Patrick’s Day Parade. With a father who, in his own words, had « a grandmother with Hill as a maiden name, a mother whose maiden name was O’Malley and a father who played lacrosse at the Shamrock… », how would that be surprising?

My father was Ti-Mick Côté, a garage serviceman, a part-time taxi driver and veteran of the Fusiliers Mont-Royal. I’ve already talked a little about him and others in this blog and I still have a lot to say.

We both left that morning in a car, an old green and white 1956 Chevrolet, with a rounded body, so rusty that when I hit my shin on it one day, it left a scar for eternity. We made a pit stop at the Binerie, a meeting place for taxi drivers who could eat there almost at any time. We used to say « the Binerie on Mont-Royal Street » because it was located « on Mont-Royal street » in a working-class neighbourhood which was full of children playing outside. That was long before some speculators invented « Le Plateau » as a way of making money for them. We had driven to Montreal city centre, still the Metropolis of Canada, under a sky that threatened the worst. An hour and a half after our departure, our stomach was full but we were worried. We finally found ourselves at the strategic waiting place at the curb. With a touch of Quebecois fatality in our eyes, the weather did not look that good. As we left the house, the temperature was chilly and the streets were under thick and grey skies. We had been psychologically prepared for what was to come under an Irish and Scottish winter. Lo and behold, as we were waiting at the curb there was a change in temperature as only this city can offer, whether positive or negative. And in just one hour, the weather forecasted magically disappeared, giving way to ideal weather…

I was very happy and waiting with my two feet firmly planted on the edge of the pavement with my back resting on my father’s belly. My father was standing right behind me. All we had to do was to take part in a game of who would be the first to see the arrival of the head of the procession from a distance. And so, under a pure azure sky, we witnessed the first energetic comings and goings of the pre-parade scouts and, more importantly, finally began to hear the plaintive and moving sound of the Black Watch bagpipes which I knew and my old man had meant.

My father’s instructions were that when the men of this regiment were passing by, I was to stand perfectly straight, head up in silence and no matter what happened, not to move an eyelash, because at the same time, he was to give the most beautiful military salute possible. The salute given by us was a very important symbol. My father had reminded me each time…

“During the war, the Fusiliers Mont-Royal and the Black Watch fought side by side many times to push back Hitler’s army. And that neither of us ever gave up…” He added… “That year he could also have joined the Black Watch…” but that I had finally chosen the Fusiliers because his language was French. In short, all these things made me think, as a child, that under those circumstances it was only natural that the bagpipes should give me the emotions they did. Moreover the regiment’s drums sounded like those of our old Compagnie franche de la Marine which we used to go and see in the middle of summer at the Fort of Saint-Helene Island…

When the music passed us by, of course I did what I had to. Except that suddenly a startling sensation came over me. Something like three drops of rain falling on my head. “But it’s not raining… Could it be a sparrow?”, I said to myself without moving and scanning the sky left and right. As soon as the bagpipes passed, I touched the top of my head to see what it could be. No, it wasn’t bird’s dropping, so it could only be water. I asked my father who was watching me, if he hadn’t received some drops. He simply said that maybe he had, but that he hadn’t bothered because he was perfectly at attention honouring the Black Watch that were passing by. Mockingly, he added that I’d better get back watching the parade because if I missed it, I’d have to wait a long time for the next one…

The rest of the parade went very smoothly, as you can imagine, but on the way back the whole thing seemed rather too strange. I asked my father if he had ever seen a weather phenomenon like that and then, probably coming from those Scottish and Irish roots that gave him the ability to communicate with elves and leprechauns, he replied, “You know, sometimes some bagpipes make it rain without anyone being able to understand it. But then, it happens so infrequently that you can consider it a great chance to be personally affected.”

At eight or at most nine years old, this became a certainty. For a few years, I felt the luckiest to have found this little happiness. But in reality, this was only the beginning of a story that would last for decades.

The following year, I believe, it was with my Dad that I saw for the first time a 1962 movie which was soon to become one of the most famous war movies: The Longest Day. And as you no doubt know, one of the events in the film was the crossing of the Bénouville Bridge in Normandy (code-named Pegasus Bridge) by Lord Lovat and his ‘piper’ (born in Regina in 1922), Bill Millin.

 

 

The thing seemed to me a pure fantasy, exactly of the kind I already knew the Americans were capable of inventing, so my father explained to me without elaborating too much that, despite a few small details, it had indeed taken place. And that it happened quite often in war that reality was more incredible than fiction and that he could give me dozens of examples of this kind of thing. And that one day, when I will be older, we might talk about it again if I was still interested.

Time passed too quickly and one evening in 1983, my Dad Ti-Mick left this earth to join many of his twenty year old friends. For his funeral, very modest I assure you, one of his brothers in arms with whom he had remained close all his life, Mr. Arthur Fraser, asked me if I had the idea of playing some bagpipes in church. I told him that he had a good idea, that I had a tape player to do it and that I would talk to the priest. I then asked the veteran in question if he had any suggestions for the song, as he was of Scottish origin. He then suggested When the pipers play. I don’t need to tell you any more about it except that if you don’t know anything about the lyrics, I suggest you read them and you will understand the rest.

Life went on and one day I decided to move to France. Since then, every two or three years my wife and I go to the commemorations in Normandy where we have made friends. And there, on a day of commemoration in Dieppe, I was given to learn two historical facts. The first was that on August 19, 1942 (the bloodiest page in the history of the Canadian Army), a detachment of the Black Watch was among those who landed (including the Fusiliers Mont-Royal) and those who were not killed became prisoners of war.

And the second is that the liberation of Dieppe in 1944 was carried out by the same regiments that had stormed the city two years earlier. These two Montreal regiments not only marched together to the applause and flowers of the city’s inhabitants, but that the Black Watch stood on guard of honour to salute the other regiments with bagpipes, including, of course, the Fusiliers.

And if that wasn’t bad enough for Ti-Mick, this was a month after these two infantry regiments had fought side by side and were decimated south of Caen, facing what is still identified today as the most powerful German armoured division of the Second World War, Kurt Meyer’s 12th SS Hitlerjugend Panzer Division (nicknamed Panzermeyer, or ‘Meyer the armoured’).

So this is the end of my story about a certain St. Patrick’s Day Parade from my childhood in Montreal in the mid-1960s. This is how I came to understand the tears my father was shedding that day.

What’s that you say? At 65, I no longer believe in Elves or Goblins?

Oh. I didn’t say that. You’d be wrong because during a commemoration day in Bénouville, without anticipating it, my wife Isabelle and I found ourselves stopped in the middle of a bridge to hear bagpipes.

And we can now testify that Ti-Mick had indeed been advised by these mysterious entities to tell the truth about bagpipes.

Because by the time I grabbed the camera to take the following shot, quite unexpectedly and while it was perfectly sunny, it suddenly started to rain in the car.

So who knows if one of these days, you might be a witness to such a phenomenon?

Thank you for reading.

Yves Côté, son of Ti-Mick


Below is a link to When the Pipers Play.

Lyrics

I hear the voice, I hear the war
I hear the sound, on a distant shore
I feel the spirit of yesterday,
I touch the past, when the pipers play.
The pipes kept playing, for you and me
They kept on saying, we will soon be free
And your soul will never fade away
You’ll live forever, when the pipers play
The pibroch rears its deadly cry
Ah, some will live and some will die
And though they passed so far away
I feel their presence when the pipers play
The pipes kept playing, for you and me
They kept on saying, we will soon be free
And your soul will never fade away
You’ll live forever, when the pipers play
It speaks of love, I have lost
Its speaks of my eternal cost
It speaks the price of peace today
A price remembered, when the pipers play
We do remember when the pipers play
The pipes kept playing, for you and me
They kept on saying we will soon be free
And your soul will never fade away
You’ll live forever, when the pipers play
The pipes kept playing, for you and me
They kept on saying we will soon be free
And your soul will never fade away
You’ll live forever, when the pipers play
Source: Musixmatch

Les cornemuses qui font pleuvoir

Mis à jour le 19 mars 2022

Un certain synchronisme de temps entre ce qui se déroule sur le Vieux Continent et la Fête de la Saint-Patrick m’a poussé à proposer ce texte à Souvenirs de Guerre. Bien que cette fête ne soit pas celle des Écossais, qui est la Saint-André, du concours de l’immigration d’origine celte et des événements de l’histoire, il est devenu si traditionnel en Amérique du Nord d’y entendre les « cornemusiers » écossais que nul n’y voit de difficulté. D’ailleurs, Irlande et Écosse ne sont-ils pas deux pays celtes ?

Parmi les villes de ce continent ayant un défilé historique pour cette fête, depuis plus d’un siècle et demi Montréal se trouve en tête de liste. Dans la gaieté envahissante de la très populaire « Parade », les Montréalais lui attachent toutefois un sens très particulier : celui de l’arrivée imminente et tant espérée du printemps.

L’histoire vraie qui suit débuta en un jour devenu lointain de mon enfance, soit en 1964 ou en 1965 puisque j’avais moins de 10 ans. Tel on m’avait initié très tôt à la Fête Nationale du Québec, jour de la Saint-Jean Baptiste, on m’avait aussi donné précocement pour coutume d’être à la Parade de la Saint-Patrick. Avec un père qui selon ses mots avait « une grand-mère Hill, une mère O’Maley et un père qui jeune avait joué à la cross au Shamrock… », comment cela serait-il surprenant, je vous le demande ?

Le père en question c’était Ti-Mick, homme de service dans un garage, un chauffeur de taxi part-time et un Vétéran des Fusiliers Mont-Royal dont j’ai déjà un peu parlé dans ce blog. « Un peu » parce de lui et d’autres, il me reste encore beaucoup à dire.

Partis tous les deux ce matin-là en voiture, une vieille Chevrolet 1956 verte et blanche, toute en rondeurs de carrosserie, mais si rouillée qu’en m’y cognant un jour le tibia elle m’avait imprégné une cicatrice pour l’éternité, puisque la guérison n’efface pas pour autant les traces de chocs, faisant un pit stop à la Binerie, rendez-vous des chauffeurs de taxi qui pouvaient y manger quasiment à toute heure (on disait alors « la Binerie de la rue Mont-Royal » parce que se trouvant « sur Mont-Royal » dans un quartier ouvrier rempli d’enfants qui jouaient dehors et bien avant que par gentrification rentable pour eux, quelques spéculateurs inventent « Le Plateau » …), nous avions alors roulé jusqu’au centre-ville (de ce qui était encore la Métropole du Canada…) sous un ciel qui menaçait du pire. Une heure et demie après notre départ, rassasiés mais inquiets, nous nous trouvions donc enfin sur le lieu stratégique d’attente, en bordure du trottoir mais avec un brin de fatalité toute québécoise dans nos regards pour un temps qui ne s’annonçait pas au mieux. Ayant quitté la maison avec quelques petits degrés, route faite sous ciel épais et gris, nous nous préparions donc psychologiquement pour la suite sous climat d’Irlande et d’Écosse en hiver. Sauf que surprise !, notre attente en bordure de rue s’accompagna d’un changement de températures comme seule sans doute cette ville donne à connaître, que cela soit en positif comme en négatif par ailleurs. Et en une heure à peine, le temps prévu s’effaça comme par magie, faisant place à un temps de rêves…

Moi très heureux, les deux pieds bien posés sur le bord de la chaîne de trottoir et le dos bien appuyé sur le ventre de mon père pour attendre et lui, se trouvant tout juste derrière moi en me surpassant, nous n’avions plus donc qu’à participer au concours de qui sera le premier à voir de loin l’arrivée de la tête de cortège ? Et sous un pur soleil d’azur, nous avons donc assisté aux premiers allers-et-venus énergiques des éclaireurs d’avant-défilé et surtout, avons enfin commencé à entendre le son plaintif et émouvant des cornemuses des Black Watch. Ce que je savais pour moi et mon paternel vouloir dire.

La consigne que mon père avait établie était qu’au passage des hommes de ce régiment, j’avais à me tenir parfaitement droit, tête haute en silence et quoi qu’il arrive, de ne pas bouger d’un cil parce que lui au même moment, il devait faire le plus beau salut militaire que possible. Le message donné par nous comme en symbole m’était connu comme très important. « Pendant la guerre, les Fusiliers et les Black Watch nous avons plusieurs fois combattu côte à côte pour faire reculer l’armée d’Hitler. Et que jamais aucun des deux n’avait abandonné… » me rappelait-il à chaque fois. Y ajoutant cette année-là « qu’il aurait aussi pu s’enrôler dans les Black Watch et qu’il avait finalement choisi les Fusiliers parce que sa langue est le français ». En somme, toutes choses donnant ainsi à penser à l’enfant que j’étais que dans les circonstances, il ne pouvait être que normal que les cornemuses me procurent l’émotion qu’elles me donnaient. Surtout que pour moi, en plus les tambours du régiment résonnaient comme ceux de notre ancienne Compagnie franche de la Marine qu’on allait voir en plein été au Fort de l’Île Saint-Hélène…

Lorsque la musique passa devant nous, bien sûr je fis ce que je dus. Sauf que soudainement une surprenante sensation me vint. Toc, toc, toc sur ma tête comme trois gouttes de pluie. « Mais il ne pleut pas ! Est-ce que ça viendrait pas peut-être d’un moineau ? », me suis-je dit sans bouger et en balayant le ciel des yeux, gauche-droite. Aussitôt les cornemuses passées, je me touchai le dessus de la tête pour voir de quoi il pouvait s’agir. Non ce n’était pas le largage de quelques cadeaux d’oiseaux et donc, ce ne pouvait être que de l’eau. Mon père me regardant faire, je lui demandai s’il n’avait pas reçu des gouttes lui aussi ? Et il se contenta de me dire que peut-être, mais qu’il n’en avait pas fait de cas parce qu’il était parfaitement à l’attention pour honorer les Black Watch qui passaient. Un peu moqueur, il ajouta que je serais mieux de revenir au défilé parce que si je manquais de le faire, j’aurais à attendre longtemps pour le suivant…

Le reste du défilé se déroula des plus chaudement, comme vous l’imaginez, mais au retour l’affaire me semblait quand même plutôt trop nébuleuse. Je m’enquis auprès de mon père pour savoir s’il avait déjà vu un phénomène météo comme celui-là et là, venant probablement de ces racines écossaises et irlandaises qui lui donnaient à communiquer avec elfes et farfadets, il me répondit « Tu sais, il arrive que certaines cornemuses fassent pleuvoir sans que personne puisse y comprendre quelque chose. Mais bon, ça n’arrive tellement pas souvent qu’on peut considérer une grande chance d’être personnellement touché. »

J’avais huit ou tout au plus neuf ans, l’affaire devint une certitude. Pendant quelques années, je me sentis le plus chanceux de tous d’avoir trouvé mon petit bonheur. Mais en réalité, ce ne fut là que l’amorce d’une histoire qui dura des décennies.

L’année suivante je crois, c’est aux côtés de ce Ti-Mick que j’appelais Daddy que je vis pour la première fois un film de 1962 qui allait vite devenir un des films de guerre et en particulier, du cinéma américain : Le Jour le plus long (la version française de The Longest Day). Et vous le savez sans aucun doute, l’un des événements qui y furent romancés est la traversée du Pont de Bénouville en Normandie (au nom de code allié Pegasus Bridge ) par Lord Lovat et son « cornemusier » (né à Régina en 1922), Bill Millin.

 

 

La chose me paraissant une pure fantaisie, exactement du genre de celles que je savais déjà les États-uniens capables d’inventer, mon père m’expliqua sans trop s’étendre que malgré quelques petits détails, cela s’était bel et bien déroulé. Et qu’il arrivait assez souvent en guerre que la réalité soit plus incroyable que la fiction et qu’il pourrait me donner des dizaines d’exemples de ce genre de choses. Et qu’un jour, lorsque je serais plus vieux, on en reparlerait peut-être si cela m’intéressait encore.

Le temps passa ensuite trop vite et un soir de 1983, Ti-Mick partit rejoindre beaucoup des ses amis de vingt ans. Pour ses funérailles, très modestes je vous l’assure, un de ses frères d’armes avec qui il était resta proche toute sa vie, monsieur Arthur Fraser, me demanda si j’avais l’idée de faire entendre un peu de cornemuse à l’église. Je lui répondis qu’il avait une bonne idée, que j’avais un lecteur de cassettes pour le faire et que j’en parlerais donc au prêtre. Je demandai alors au Vétéran en question s’il n’avait pas une suggestion à me faire pour le morceau, puisqu’il était d’origine écossaise. Il me proposa ensuite « When the pipers play ». Il est inutile que je vous en dise plus sinon que si vous n’en connaissez rien de ses paroles, je vous suggère de les lire et vous comprendrez le reste.

Et la vie poursuivit son cours, ce qui me donna un jour de partir habiter en France. Depuis lors, tous les deux ou trois ans mon épouse et moi allons aux commémorations en Normandie où nous nous sommes fait des amis. Et là, un jour de commémoration à Dieppe, il m’a été donné d’apprendre deux faits historiques. Le premier, que le 19 août 1942 (la page la plus sanglante de l’histoire de l’armée canadienne), un détachement des Black Watch était du nombre qui a débarqué (dont les Fusiliers Mont-Royal) et que ceux qui n’y furent pas tués, devinrent prisonniers de guerre.

Et le deuxième, que la libération de la ville en 1944 fut réalisée par les mêmes régiments qui étaient à l’assaut deux ans plus tôt et qu’alors, les deux régiments de Montréal non seulement défilèrent ensemble sous les applaudissements et les fleurs de ses habitants, mais que les Black Watch se postèrent en garde d’honneur pour saluer les autres régiments à la cornemuse, dont celui des Fusiliers bien entendu.

Et comme si cela ne suffisait pas déjà en signification pour Ti-Mick, un mois après que ces deux régiments d’infanterie se soient battus côte-à-côte et aient été décimées au sud de Caen, en faisant face à ce qui est toujours identifiée aujourd’hui comme la plus puissante division blindée allemande de la Seconde Guerre mondiale, la 12e Panzerdivision SS Hitlerjugend de Kurt Meyer (surnommé Panzermeyer, soit « Meyer le blindé »).

Voilà donc amis/es lecteurs et lectrices, ici la fin de mon histoire au sujet d’une certaine Parade de la Saint-Patrick de mon enfance à Montréal au milieu des années 60. Voici surtout comment il me fut donné de comprendre peu à peu les larmes échappées par mon père ce jour-là.

Vous dites? C’est donc qu’à 65 ans je crois enfin plus ni aux Elfes, ni aux Farfadets?

Ah non, je n’ai pas dit cela. Détrompez-vous parce qu’en un jour de commémoration à Bénouville, sans le prévoir mon épouse Isabelle nous nous sommes retrouvés arrêtés en plein milieu d’un pont à entendre venir des cornemuses.

Et nous pouvons en témoigner maintenant avec conviction, Ti-Mick avait bel et bien été conseillé par ces entités mystérieuses pour dire la vérité au sujet de ces instruments de musique.

Parce que le temps d’attraper l’appareil photo pour prendre le cliché qui suit, de manière tout à fait inattendue et alors qu’il faisait parfaitement soleil, soudainement il se mit à pleuvoir dans la voiture.

Alors qui sait si un de ces quatre, vous-mêmes ne serez pas témoin d’un tel phénomène?

Merci à vous de m’avoir lu ici !

Yves Côté, fils de Ti-Mick


Ci-dessous un lien vers When the Pipers Play.

Paroles

I hear the voice, I hear the war
I hear the sound, on a distant shore
I feel the spirit of yesterday,
I touch the past, when the pipers play.

The pipes kept playing, for you and me
They kept on saying, we will soon be free
And your soul will never fade away
You’ll live forever, when the pipers play

The pibroch rears its deadly cry
Ah, some will live and some will die
And though they passed so far away
I feel their presence when the pipers play

The pipes kept playing, for you and me
They kept on saying, we will soon be free
And your soul will never fade away
You’ll live forever, when the pipers play

It speaks of love, I have lost
Its speaks of my eternal cost
It speaks the price of peace today
A price remembered, when the pipers play
We do remember when the pipers play

The pipes kept playing, for you and me
They kept on saying we will soon be free
And your soul will never fade away
You’ll live forever, when the pipers play

The pipes kept playing, for you and me
They kept on saying we will soon be free
And your soul will never fade away
You’ll live forever, when the pipers play

Source: Musixmatch

Ti-Mick

Un an déjà…

Souvenirs de guerre

J’ai beaucoup écrit sur le Jour le plus long.

Je vais donc céder ma place pour un instant.

Je ne suis pas allé en Normandie prendre ces photos.

Je pourrais bien vous berner et vous inventer toute une histoire comme certains vétérans l’ont probablement déjà fait. J’en ai connus et je préfère en rester là. Du moins pour le moment, car le moment n’est pas venu d’en parler. Je n’en parlerai probablement jamais plus que ça tout comme l’oncle de ma femme qui avait osé s’ouvrir un jour du mois de juillet 2009.

Ce fut sans doute son Jour le plus long après le naufrage de l’Athabaskan le 29 avril 1944.

Ce blogue lui rend hommage même s’il avait pu raconter cette anecdote du naufrage à la blague.

Mais je ne crois pas qu’il l’ait fait. Il n’était pas homme à trahir ses frères d’armes.

Revoici d’autres photos envoyées par…

Voir l’article original 587 mots de plus

Je ne suis pas un historien…

J’avais écrit ce billet en juillet dernier. J’avais tardé à le publier, car la colère n’est jamais bonne conseillère. Un historien m’avait écrit pour me demander mon aide. Je ne suis pas un historien loin de là.

J’écris seulement ce qu’on me raconte. J’ai une formation en enseignement de l’histoire tout au plus. Elle date des années 60. Ma passion pour l’histoire de la Deuxième Guerre mondiale s’est transformée radicalement au fil des années. Elle avait été influencée par les films d’Hollywood et la construction de modèles réduits. Il fallait bien commencer par quelque chose en 1958. Puis ma rencontre de l’oncle de ma femme a changé ma vision de la guerre et m’a amené à créer ce blogue, puis une série d’autres tant en langue française qu’en langue anglaise.

Souvenirs de guerre a enfanté 425 Alouette qui est devenu 425 Les Alouettes. Les Alouettes c’est comme ça que les vétérans appelaient l’escadrille 425 Alouette qui était en réalité un escadron.

Compliqué? Ce n’est pas grave.

Compliqué, c’est de lire mes blogues sur la Deuxième Guerre mondiale. En fait il ne faut pas les lire, mais les découvrir comme l’a fait Sharon Tremblay dont j’ai raconté l’histoire de son beau-père Georges Tremblay sur 425 Les Alouettes. Les découvrir comme Ti-Mick qui a bien voulu collaborer en partageant ses réflexions et ses photos sur le débarquement de Normandie.

Le débarquement, on en a écrit des choses, des vertes et des pas mûres. Les sanglots longs des violons de l’automne? Pas tout à fait. Ce serait les dés sont sur la table qui était le message codé! Ce n’est pas grave, le débarquement a quand même eu lieu.

Si je vous radote tout ceci, c’est que dans l’histoire de famille de ma conjointe, son autre oncle aurait été blessé sur les plages de Normandie. Il était dans les Fusiliers Mont-Royal. Il ne pouvait avoir été sur les plages, car ce régiment n’y était pas le Jour le plus long. Je me suis fait avoir! Ce n’est pas grave, il a été blessé après le débarquement et il est mort en 1964 des séquelles de sa blessure.  

Si je vous radote tout ceci encore c’est qu’on ne sait jamais toute la vérité sur le débarquement. Des vétérans en ont raconté des vertes et des pas mûres sur leur participation. Des livres ont été écrits. On doit se fier à la parole des vétérans ou bien les démasquer. Mais à quoi cela servirait-il à moins bien sûr de relater ces faits d’armes de nouveau sans vérifier les sources.

Bonne réflexion…

Un moment des plus émouvants pour nous

Un oubli de ma part…

Un court texte de Ti-Mick dont le père était sur les plages de Dieppe en 1942.

Voilà quelques photos de plus.

Il en restera un autre à venir, celle d’un ami Écossais très cher qui, en 44, était messager en moto pour l’armée anglaise. Des histoires uniques qu’il m’a raconté en même temps qu’à son fils… Dont une qui a confirmé quelque chose d’étonnant à propos des Fusiliers Mont-Royal et dont deux des frères d’armes de mon père m’avait déjà parlé autrefois. Quel hasard !!! Il me faut la chercher dans le tas de photos non-classées dans l’ordo. Je te l’enverrai demain je pense…

Les deux dames étaient des infirmières de troupes US au front. Restées amies pour la vie, à l’âge de presque 95 ans, elles revenaient une nouvelle fois en Normandie. Les photos ont été prises au cimetière de Colleville. La télévision française a fait des reportages sur elles quelques jours avant le 6 juin et par hasard, nous les avons rencontré le 4 Juin au matin en allant rendre hommage à tous ces jeunes qui dorment en terre américaine de France. L’homme faisait partie des troupes en question et revenait en France pour la première fois…

Ce jour-là, de voir ces trois personnes réunies près du mausolée aux disparus sans tombes, ce fut un moment des plus émouvants pour nous.

Les Diables rouges

Je suis parti trop vite en vacancces hier…

Autre texte de la plume de Ti-Mick.

Pour que le Débarquement du 6 juin soit une réussite, il aura fallu construire et faire voler une multitude d’engins de mort.

Mais au travers de ceux-ci, quelques appareils très différents furent de la première importance. Ceux-là, je les appellerai » les engins de la pure liberté ». Les seules victimes qu’ils firent, furent les passagers et les pilotes eux-mêmes de ces appareils fait en contre-plaqué. Lorsqu’ils glissaient malheureusement sur un obstacle, ils se déchiraient. Et lorsqu’il frappaient un mur ou un véhicule, ils éclataient tout simplement.

Côté U.S., ils portaient le nom de WACO. Côté anglais, ils s’appelaient les HORSA.
Le Waco CG-4 faisait à peu près la moitié en taille du Horsa. Le premier pouvant transporter 15 hommes de troupes commandos aéroportés et un jeep, le deuxième, le double. Ces planeurs étaient au départ remorqués à la vitesse de 150 à 200 km/h avant d’être décrochés au-dessus de la Manche. Ils devaient alors voler librement jusqu’à destination, à environ 30 kilomètres de leur largage par un avion motorisé.

C’est donc dans la nuit de pleine lune du 5 au 6 juin 44, ne volant qu’à vue et avec très peu d’instruments de mesure, que quelques dizaines de ces deux appareils firent leurs preuves absolues. Quelques heures avant le Débarquement, pour un effet de surprise total, des avant-troupes aéro-transportées eurent la mission de s’emparer des deux endroits militairement les plus stratégiques de Normandie. Ils avaient à les tenir coûte que coûte, jusqu’à ce que les troupes aéroportées plus nombreuses, les parachutistes, les y rejoignent en force. Les avant-troupes états-uniennes usant des Wacos pour le Cotentin, autour et sur Saint-Mère-Eglise, les anglaises, dont un certain nombre de Canadiens des deux langues, faisant de même entre les villages de Ranville et Bénouville.

Pour moi, ces deux opérations furent sans doute le symbole le plus significatif de la proximité constante des deux particularités humaines nécessaires pour abattre le nazisme en Europe: la folie apparente des idées techniques et l’intelligence totale obligatoire à leur réussite.

D’ailleurs, ne connaissons-nous pas tous les deux récits de ces exploits ? Eux qui ont été racontés par le vétéran Cornelius Ryan dans « Le Jour le plus long » ? Et qui furent repris en 1961 lors du tournage du film du même nom, celui-ci plus romancé que le livre… Avec l’image du parachutiste US qui était accroché au clocher de l’église de Sainte-Mère-Eglise et le pont sur lequel un cornemusier qui ainsi deviendra célèbre traversa. Structure d’acier qui fut ensuite rebaptisé « Pegasus Bridge », en raison de l’épaulière à l’effigie de Pégase qui orne leurs uniformes des parachutistes anglais (l’autre, moins célèbre, prenant le nom de « Horsa Bridge »).

Voici donc quelques photos prises en Normandie de ces deux appareils, pour Souvenirs de guerre. Et quelques autres du véritable pont et surtout, je m’en excuse, de quelqu’un pour qui j’ai cultivé un attachement profond depuis mon enfance. Ce dont je parlerai sans doute un jour, mais seulement lorsque le moment de le faire sera venu…

D’abord, quelques-unes d’un Waco CG-4 qui a presque entièrement été refait à l’identique par une bande de Vendéens furieux sous la gouverne de Monsieur Arnaud Villalard. Le groupe de Vendéens qui a refait le Waco CG-4 se nomme « Les Diables Rouges ». Les deux responsables qui sont tant à l’origine du projet que les motivateurs de troupe sont Arnaud Villalard (ce nom je l’avais) et Michel Praud (celui-ci me manquait) et ils sont de Saint-Jean-des-Monts.

Ils tiennent ainsi à rendre hommage à ces hommes qui eurent la mission d’utiliser ce moyen de déplacement pour, une fois toujours vivant arrivé au sol, si toujours vivants, prendre d’assaut et tenir quelques positions des plus déterminantes qui se trouvaient, bien entendu, en plein coeur du système défensif allemand du Cotentin.

Tout de la recherche de ces « reconstituteurs », de leur travail, du déplacement de l’appareil et aussi de leurs dépenses, vient d’une implication entièrement bénévole pour cette tâche qu’ils ont fait leur. Ils se font connaître sous le nom de  »   « . Détail qui n’est pas qu’une anecdote, l’appareil est baptisé du prénom de l’agricultrice âgée qui a prêté sa veille grange à ces originaux géniaux qui ont osé se lancer dans cette affaire, sans ne rien y connaître au départ : Odile.

Tout cela, question peut-être de nous faire plutôt chanter « J’en reviens pas de la Vendée… » ?

 

Le Pegasus Bridge de 1944. Il est conservé au Mémorial Pegasus depuis son remplacement pour un plus large, de manière à  faciliter la circulation automobile plus intense qu’autrefois.

IMG_2919Le cornemusier de Lord Lovat : Bill Millin. Lord Lovat, témoin lui-même et preuve irréfutables qu’est fausse l’affirmation fréquente « d’historiens », que personne ayant été du Raid de Dieppe en 1942 ne se trouva à  débarquer le 6 juin 44 en Normandie…

IMG_2893La cornemuse de l’homme, percée de deux balles, et ses attributs militaires de 1944.

IMG_2894

Sur l’actuel pont de Bénouville, le 5 juin 2014. N’entendez-vous pas les cornemuses ?

IMG_2800

Souvenirs de Dieppe

Un lecteur m’a confié cette anecdote qu’on lui avait confié…
Il me parlait d’un vétéran qui était à Dieppe tout comme le père de Ti-Mick mon collaborateur anonyme.

Scène du débarquement de Dieppe.Année: 1942. © nd Auteur: inconnu. Commanditaire: Canada Wide. Référence: Canada Wide.

Voici le courriel de mon lecteur…
Il y a quelques années, j’avais rencontré la femme et la fille d’un vétéran.
Voici le récit de la seule histoire de guerre qu’il a racontée.
Lorsque vous avez raconté que la famille d’Eugène Gagnon aurait jeté sa DFC, je n’ai pas de difficulté à le croire…
Sa fille m’a raconté la seule et unique histoire que son père a bien voulu que la famille sache. Une fois sur la plage de Dieppe, lui et deux de ses camarades se sont réfugiés dans un petit véhicule mis hors-service. Il s’était penché quelques instants pour ramasser quelque chose au sol et il y eut une déflagration. Ses deux amis venaient d’être décapités par l’obus! Il réussi à nager jusqu’à une embarcation. Il fut atteint par quelques balles à une jambe dont il perdit l’usage. Au retour de la guerre, ses voisins le virent jeter avec force quelque chose de métallique dans une poubelle sur la rue. Voulant voir ce que c’était, il y ramassèrent ses… médailles! Ils les rapportèrent à sa femme. Elle les cacha pendant plusieurs années. Un bon jour ce vétéran de Dieppe les découvrit et demanda pourquoi ses médailles étaient toujours ici?
Elle lui dit que c’était important et que ce sont des souvenirs…
Sa réponse?
Ce n’est que de la ferraille qui ne veut rien dire…

Débarquement du 6 juin 1944

Un autre texte de Ti-Mick, le surnom de son père quand il était avec les Fusiliers Mont-Royal.

Voilà, le Débarquement du 6 juin 1944 fut enfin une réussite.

Mais son prix et celui de la Libération européenne fut grand pour tous les pays « normalement constitués » et tous les peuples, politiquement libres d’eux-mêmes ou pas, qui ne se laissèrent pas bercer par les solutions grossières et d’apparence facile du nazisme…

Nazisme en abrégé français, Nationalsozialismus et National-Socialisme en versions originales allemande et française.

Quelle duperie tragique que celle-là !

Duperie contre laquelle plusieurs, comme mon propre paternel, partis d’un autre continent, payèrent une bêtise politique qui pourtant n’était pas la leur, jusqu’à leur mort. Bêtise politique qui pourtant n’était pas la leur et pour laquelle, aussi et surtout, plusieurs autres, trop, beaucoup trop, infiniment trop d’autres, perdirent de leur jeune vie.

Sans parler de toutes ces victimes civiles qui périrent sous les bombardements et les combats.

Je n’en dirai pas plus, cela ne servirait à rien.

Il vaut mieux que je vous laisse tout simplement regarder quelques-unes de mes photos.

Cimetière de Colleville-Sur-Mer, le 4 juin dernier.

 

IMG_2645

Cimetière de Colleville-Sur-Mer

IMG_2647

Cimetière de Colleville-Sur-Mer

IMG_2649

Cimetière de Colleville-Sur-Mer

Cimetière de Cintheaux, le 5 juin dernier.

IMG_3165

Cimetière de Cintheaux

 

IMG_3166

 Cimetière de Cintheaux

  IMG_3174

Cimetière de Cintheaux

Et là, deux drapeaux comme deux colonnes d’honneur.

IMG_3173

A l’entrée de l’allée qui mène au Cimetière, stèle en mémoire du plus jeune soldat allié tué au combat lors de la Seconde Guerre Mondiale.

IMG_3143

 

IMGP0093_2

Celui qu’ils appelaient leur « petit gars », était de la même unité que mon père.

 IMG_3153

Et pour finir aujourd’hui, quelques coquelicots de Normandie pour tous ceux et celles qui, bien qu’ils ne peuvent pas s’y rendre, ont tout de même à cœur de cultiver notre « Je me souviens ».

IMGP1094

 

 

Les plages de Normandie

Mise à jour le 15 août 2021

Un texte écrit de la plume d’un lecteur. Il écrit sous le pseudonyme de Ti-Mick.

Pour un Québécois, il y a plusieurs manières de visiter les plages de Normandie.
En allant du sud au nord, ou du nord au sud ? Ou en choisissant selon qu’elles sont de Débarquement états-uniens, anglais ou canadiens ? Ou encore, en procédant au hasard des Commémorations et des événements, lorsque le 6 juin est proche.

Mais toutefois, il n’y a que deux alternatives pour les aborder : celle-là du touriste qui a pour but de faire les plages du Débarquement parce qu’elles sont sur son itinéraire ou bien celle autre, d’une personne qui a le sens du sacré. Mais alors, c’est d’abord le temps qui prend une toute autre valeur.

IMG_2676

A chaque fois que je me retrouve sur une de ces plages, celles-ci incluant celle de Dieppe, je suis visité par l’arrivée toute en douceur de milliers de jeunes hommes dans la vingtaine qui émergent de la Manche.

En tenues de combat, ils marchent lentement vers le dur en sortant peu à peu et tout naturellement d’une eau calme. Exactement comme si rien ne pouvait perturber leur avancée.

Armes en bandoulières, lentement ils progressent vers une foule de plus en plus imposantes d’hommes âgées qui ne sont plus en armes depuis longtemps, leur nombre s’accompagnant de plusieurs femmes du même âge qui se trouvent dispersées au travers.

Mais le plus étonnant de tout cela n’est pas pour moi cette vision. Le plus étonnant, c’est qu’au fur et à mesure que rencontrent ces jeunes qui sortent des flots et ces anciens qui les accueillent, comme par évanescence, ils disparaissent ensemble lorsqu’ils se rejoignent et se sourient.

A chaque fois que je me trouve sur l’une de ces plages de sable ou de galet, c’est la même scène qui me revient.

IMG_2669

Et alors, deux questions m’angoissent.

IMG_3056

Lorsque seront morts tous ceux qui, jeunes, ont survécu aux jours sombres de cette guerre, continueront-ils à venir sur ces plages le 6 juin de chaque année, pour accueillir symboliquement leurs jeunes frères en liberté qui eux, n’auront pas connu l’outrage de vieillir ?

IMG_3057

Parce que s’ils ne le font plus, comment alors continuerons-nous de croire que nous le ferons encore nous-mêmes ?

Ti-Mick

J’ai beaucoup écrit sur le Jour le plus long.

Je vais donc céder ma place pour un instant.

Je ne suis pas allé en Normandie prendre ces photos.

Ce diaporama nécessite JavaScript.

Je pourrais bien vous berner et vous inventer toute une histoire comme certains vétérans l’ont probablement déjà fait. J’en ai connus et je préfère en rester là. Du moins pour le moment, car le moment n’est pas venu d’en parler. Je n’en parlerai probablement jamais plus que ça tout comme l’oncle de ma femme qui avait osé s’ouvrir un jour du mois de juillet 2009.

Ce fut sans doute son Jour le plus long après le naufrage de l’Athabaskan le 29 avril 1944.

Ce blogue lui rend hommage même s’il avait pu raconter cette anecdote du naufrage à la blague.

Mais je ne crois pas qu’il l’ait fait. Il n’était pas homme à trahir ses frères d’armes.

Revoici d’autres photos envoyées par un lecteur de Souvenirs de guerre.

C’est Ti-Mick, le même qui m’a envoyé les précédentes.

Ce diaporama nécessite JavaScript.

Ti-Mick veut rester anonyme.

No problem…

Assez difficile pour moi de le rester sur ce blogue par contre.

Salut Pierre.

Content que tu aies enfin reçu les photos…

Pas simple pour moi, succession d’imprévus dont je te parlerai quand on se verra, dont un ordi portable qui décide de faire des caprices, mais bon, allons-y !

Alors donc, tu trouveras ci-dessous quelques autres photos qui elles, s’adresseront je crois à ceux qui s’intéressent aux avions.

Les premières photos portent sur la reconstitution d’un planeur Waco par un groupe de jeunes qui ont à coeur de rendre hommage aux aviateurs et parachutistes alliés qui ont donné le meilleur de leurs qualités d’intervention pour libérer l’Europe de la tyrannie nazie.

Une des particularités de ce groupe est qu’il est constitué d’ouvriers de plusieurs champs de compétences. Ce sont des gens qui sans être très instruits, ont la détermination de réussir des projets qui apparaissent impossibles à la plupart des êtres « normalement constitués »… Comme si, par un curieux et secret mécanisme de l’Histoire, se prolongeait un peu en eux de ce qui habitait nos Anciens qui, encore jeunes, ont fait leur part outre-mer.

Mais une autre des particularités de ceux-ci est qu’aucun d’eux n’est Normand et que de leur Charentes-Maritimes natales, aucun de leurs propres parents n’ont connu le débarquement et les combats de la Libération. Étonnant, n’est-ce pas ?
Et finalement, dernier particularisme, leur financement, outre que de venir de leurs propres deniers, ne sort des poches que de ces petites gens qui les entourent au quotidien : parenté, voisins, témoins sympathiques de leurs efforts, etc. Cela, sans parler des difficultés rencontrées au quotidien pour se mobiliser le soir, les fins de semaine et les jours de congé…

Ces photos ont été prises dans un champ d’une commune de Normandie qui s’appelle Saint-Côme-du-Mont. Le planeur a été reconstitué à l’identique des dimensions et des éléments entièrement extérieurs avec des pièces et du matériel de récupération. L’intérieur est à l’identique pour le cockpit, bien que ses appareils de navigation soient factices et que son espace de transport soit non-terminé (malgré ses dimensions à l’identique, il est fait de toile plutôt que de contre-plaqué).

Sache aussi que j’en ai profité pour parler aux membres de cette association de l’escadrille Alouette…

Les autres photos sont celles d’un bombardier bimoteur qui a participé à la campagne de Normandie. Il s’agit d’un Marauder Martin B-26. Il fut construit en 5000 exemplaires, 6 ou 7 hommes constituaient son équipage, était armé de 11 mitrailleuses de défense et était équipé de moteur Pratt & Wthitney R-2208-43.

Cet appareil se trouve au Musée de La Magdeleine, commune du littoral normand ayant connue le Débarquement du 6 juin 44.
Bien entendu, tout comme le planeur Waco, il présente la peinture en trois bandes blanches qui ornait tous les appareils aériens du Jour-J et qui leur permettait de ne pas être pris pour cibles par la chasse aérienne alliée. Celle-ci ayant reçu l’ordre ultime d’abattre sans aucune hésitation, tout appareil volant qui n’arborait pas ce signe distinctif.

Voilà, j’espère le tout aider à satisfaire l’intérêt particulier des amateurs…

Pour terminer, je pense que comme pseudo, tu pourrais utiliser à mon endroit celui de Ti-Mick. C’était le surnom de mon père… Je pense qu’il me donnerait sa bénédiction là-dessus.

À demain.

Un jour Ti-Mick parlera de son père sur Souvenirs de guerre.

Il était à Dieppe en 1942 si je me souviens bien.