HMCS Athabaskan, 29 avril 1944 Prologue

Premier article sur Souvenirs de guerre en ce 29 avril 2022, 78 ans après le 29 avril 1944.

Voici l’histoire du naufrage de l’Athabaskan.

L’oncle de ma femme aurait été chauffeur (stoker) à bord du destroyer Athabaskan et travaillait dans la salle des machines.

Le premier navire qui porta le nom d’Athabaskan fut lancé le 8 novembre 1941 et entra en service en 1943.

athabaskan1-1

Vers la fin d’août 1943, en tant que navire commandant un groupe de destroyers patrouillant dans le golfe de Gascogne, l’Athabaskan fut endommagé par un missile aérien lancé par un des bombardiers allemands qui attaquaient simultanément le groupe. L’Athabaskan retourna au port par ses propres moyens bien qu’une de ses chaudières et deux réservoirs à carburant aient été inondés. En février 1944, l’Athabaskan, le Huron et l’Haida rejoignirent la 10e flottille de destroyers basée à Plymouth en Angleterre. Pendant une patrouille dans la Manche dans la nuit du 29 avril, l’Athabaskan et l’Haida rencontrèrent des destroyers ennemis de la classe Elbing.

2009-08-19 T_35

Des salves répétés de canons touchèrent les navires ennemis et un des destroyers ennemis s’échoua. Pendant la bataille l’Athabaskan fut torpillé et coula. Le commandant, dix de ses officiers et 114 hommes d’équipage perdirent la vie; cinq officiers et 85 hommes d’équipage furent faits prisonniers. Un officier et 41 marins furent sauvés par l’Haida et revinrent en Angleterre.

J’ai trouvé le récit de la bataille sur Internet.

Si vous avez des souvenirs de guerre de vos ancêtres que vous souhaitez partager, vous pouvez m’écrire ici…

Ce qui est arrivé au parachutiste Oxtoby…

 

Message de Bernard Moffatt concernant ce qui est arrivé au parachutiste Oxtoby.

Suite à notre conversation de l’autre jour, j’ai fait pas mal de recherches concernant la mort du soldat Oxtoby survenue dans la même embuscade où le lieutenant Philippe Rousseau a été tué aux petites heures du 6 juin 1944.

Selon divers témoignages, le lieutenant Rousseau a rapatrié un petit groupe de soldats canadiens et britanniques après le largage erroné de son avion dans la région de Gonneville-sur-Mer. Mon père faisait partie de ce groupe de soldats regroupés qui sont tombés sur un nid de mitrailleuses allemandes près d’un bâtiment connu sous le nom de la Tuilerie.

Toujours selon les témoignages, le lieutenant Rousseau marchait en tête de file et aurait été fauché par les tirs ennemis. Le soldat Oxtoby le suivait dans la file et une grenade qu’il transportait aurait explosé sous une balle allemande, le tuant sur le coup.

Je me suis longtemps questionné sur cette histoire de grenade qui aurait explosé de façon si malchanceuse pour le soldat Oxtoby.

En consultant plusieurs ouvrages et de nombreux sites historiques, j’ai pu constaté que les parachutistes canadiens avaient accès à 3 types de grenades, lors du Jour-J :

1) des grenades à fragmentation conventionnelles, comme celle illustrée ici :

https://www.dday-overlord.com/en/material/weaponry/mills-bomb

J’ai discuté avec un membre actif de l’armée canadienne et nous avons la même opinion. Ce type de grenade n’aurait pas explosé après avoir été touchée par un tir.

2) des grenades de types Gammon, comme celle-ci :

https://www.dday-overlord.com/en/material/weaponry/no-82-gammon-bomb

On parle de ce type de grenades dans quelques livres et on mentionne que les soldats emplissaient eux-mêmes ces engins avec la quantité désirée d’explosif de type plastic C, est une arme anti-personnel efficace, simple à utiliser… Je n’ai aucune idée si le soldat Oxtoby ou quiconque d’autre dans cet avion pouvait transporter ce genre d’engins. Mais du fait de sa construction, je ne pense pas qu’une telle grenade aurait pu exploser suite à un tir direct.

3) Des grenades au phosphore de ce type :

No 77 smoke grenade – D-Day Overlord (dday-overlord.com)

Il s’agit à prime abord d’une grenade fumigène au phosphore qui pouvait aussi être employée comme grenade anti-personnel. Ces grenades étaient largement en usage parmi les troupes aéroportées lors du Jour-J.

Si on retient les témoignages des soldats présents et des citoyens français qui ont découvert les corps du soldat Oxtoby et du lieutenant Rousseau dans les jours suivants, il est tout à fait plausible que l’impact d’une balle ait pu déclencher l’explosion d’une telle bombe fumigène. Leur contenant était une simple boîte de fer blanc qui aurait été percé facilement au moment de l’impact, ce qui aurait déclenché instantanément la réaction chimique mortelle entre l’air et le phosphore blanc.

Si c’est ce qui est arrivé, alors le soldat Oxtoby a été victime d’une inqualifiable malchance…

 

Bagpipes that make it rain

A certain synchronicity of time between what is happening now on the Old Continent and St. Patrick’s Day prompted me to submit this piece to Souvenirs de guerre. Although St. Patrick’s Day is not the Scottish holiday, which is St. Andrew’s Day, due to Celtic immigration and historical events, it has become so traditional in North America to hear Scottish pipers that no one has any problem with it. Besides, aren’t Ireland and Scotland both Celtic countries?

Among the cities on this continent with a historic parade for this holiday, Montreal has been at the top of the list for over a century and a half. However, in the pervasive gaiety of the popular « Parade », Montrealers attach a very special meaning to it: that of the imminent and long-awaited arrival of spring.

The following, which is a true story, began on a distant day in my childhood, in 1964 or 1965, when I was less than 10 years old. Just as I had been introduced to Quebec’s St. Jean Baptiste Day, I had also been introduced to the St. Patrick’s Day Parade. With a father who, in his own words, had « a grandmother with Hill as a maiden name, a mother whose maiden name was O’Malley and a father who played lacrosse at the Shamrock… », how would that be surprising?

My father was Ti-Mick Côté, a garage serviceman, a part-time taxi driver and veteran of the Fusiliers Mont-Royal. I’ve already talked a little about him and others in this blog and I still have a lot to say.

We both left that morning in a car, an old green and white 1956 Chevrolet, with a rounded body, so rusty that when I hit my shin on it one day, it left a scar for eternity. We made a pit stop at the Binerie, a meeting place for taxi drivers who could eat there almost at any time. We used to say « the Binerie on Mont-Royal Street » because it was located « on Mont-Royal street » in a working-class neighbourhood which was full of children playing outside. That was long before some speculators invented « Le Plateau » as a way of making money for them. We had driven to Montreal city centre, still the Metropolis of Canada, under a sky that threatened the worst. An hour and a half after our departure, our stomach was full but we were worried. We finally found ourselves at the strategic waiting place at the curb. With a touch of Quebecois fatality in our eyes, the weather did not look that good. As we left the house, the temperature was chilly and the streets were under thick and grey skies. We had been psychologically prepared for what was to come under an Irish and Scottish winter. Lo and behold, as we were waiting at the curb there was a change in temperature as only this city can offer, whether positive or negative. And in just one hour, the weather forecasted magically disappeared, giving way to ideal weather…

I was very happy and waiting with my two feet firmly planted on the edge of the pavement with my back resting on my father’s belly. My father was standing right behind me. All we had to do was to take part in a game of who would be the first to see the arrival of the head of the procession from a distance. And so, under a pure azure sky, we witnessed the first energetic comings and goings of the pre-parade scouts and, more importantly, finally began to hear the plaintive and moving sound of the Black Watch bagpipes which I knew and my old man had meant.

My father’s instructions were that when the men of this regiment were passing by, I was to stand perfectly straight, head up in silence and no matter what happened, not to move an eyelash, because at the same time, he was to give the most beautiful military salute possible. The salute given by us was a very important symbol. My father had reminded me each time…

“During the war, the Fusiliers Mont-Royal and the Black Watch fought side by side many times to push back Hitler’s army. And that neither of us ever gave up…” He added… “That year he could also have joined the Black Watch…” but that I had finally chosen the Fusiliers because his language was French. In short, all these things made me think, as a child, that under those circumstances it was only natural that the bagpipes should give me the emotions they did. Moreover the regiment’s drums sounded like those of our old Compagnie franche de la Marine which we used to go and see in the middle of summer at the Fort of Saint-Helene Island…

When the music passed us by, of course I did what I had to. Except that suddenly a startling sensation came over me. Something like three drops of rain falling on my head. “But it’s not raining… Could it be a sparrow?”, I said to myself without moving and scanning the sky left and right. As soon as the bagpipes passed, I touched the top of my head to see what it could be. No, it wasn’t bird’s dropping, so it could only be water. I asked my father who was watching me, if he hadn’t received some drops. He simply said that maybe he had, but that he hadn’t bothered because he was perfectly at attention honouring the Black Watch that were passing by. Mockingly, he added that I’d better get back watching the parade because if I missed it, I’d have to wait a long time for the next one…

The rest of the parade went very smoothly, as you can imagine, but on the way back the whole thing seemed rather too strange. I asked my father if he had ever seen a weather phenomenon like that and then, probably coming from those Scottish and Irish roots that gave him the ability to communicate with elves and leprechauns, he replied, “You know, sometimes some bagpipes make it rain without anyone being able to understand it. But then, it happens so infrequently that you can consider it a great chance to be personally affected.”

At eight or at most nine years old, this became a certainty. For a few years, I felt the luckiest to have found this little happiness. But in reality, this was only the beginning of a story that would last for decades.

The following year, I believe, it was with my Dad that I saw for the first time a 1962 movie which was soon to become one of the most famous war movies: The Longest Day. And as you no doubt know, one of the events in the film was the crossing of the Bénouville Bridge in Normandy (code-named Pegasus Bridge) by Lord Lovat and his ‘piper’ (born in Regina in 1922), Bill Millin.

 

 

The thing seemed to me a pure fantasy, exactly of the kind I already knew the Americans were capable of inventing, so my father explained to me without elaborating too much that, despite a few small details, it had indeed taken place. And that it happened quite often in war that reality was more incredible than fiction and that he could give me dozens of examples of this kind of thing. And that one day, when I will be older, we might talk about it again if I was still interested.

Time passed too quickly and one evening in 1983, my Dad Ti-Mick left this earth to join many of his twenty year old friends. For his funeral, very modest I assure you, one of his brothers in arms with whom he had remained close all his life, Mr. Arthur Fraser, asked me if I had the idea of playing some bagpipes in church. I told him that he had a good idea, that I had a tape player to do it and that I would talk to the priest. I then asked the veteran in question if he had any suggestions for the song, as he was of Scottish origin. He then suggested When the pipers play. I don’t need to tell you any more about it except that if you don’t know anything about the lyrics, I suggest you read them and you will understand the rest.

Life went on and one day I decided to move to France. Since then, every two or three years my wife and I go to the commemorations in Normandy where we have made friends. And there, on a day of commemoration in Dieppe, I was given to learn two historical facts. The first was that on August 19, 1942 (the bloodiest page in the history of the Canadian Army), a detachment of the Black Watch was among those who landed (including the Fusiliers Mont-Royal) and those who were not killed became prisoners of war.

And the second is that the liberation of Dieppe in 1944 was carried out by the same regiments that had stormed the city two years earlier. These two Montreal regiments not only marched together to the applause and flowers of the city’s inhabitants, but that the Black Watch stood on guard of honour to salute the other regiments with bagpipes, including, of course, the Fusiliers.

And if that wasn’t bad enough for Ti-Mick, this was a month after these two infantry regiments had fought side by side and were decimated south of Caen, facing what is still identified today as the most powerful German armoured division of the Second World War, Kurt Meyer’s 12th SS Hitlerjugend Panzer Division (nicknamed Panzermeyer, or ‘Meyer the armoured’).

So this is the end of my story about a certain St. Patrick’s Day Parade from my childhood in Montreal in the mid-1960s. This is how I came to understand the tears my father was shedding that day.

What’s that you say? At 65, I no longer believe in Elves or Goblins?

Oh. I didn’t say that. You’d be wrong because during a commemoration day in Bénouville, without anticipating it, my wife Isabelle and I found ourselves stopped in the middle of a bridge to hear bagpipes.

And we can now testify that Ti-Mick had indeed been advised by these mysterious entities to tell the truth about bagpipes.

Because by the time I grabbed the camera to take the following shot, quite unexpectedly and while it was perfectly sunny, it suddenly started to rain in the car.

So who knows if one of these days, you might be a witness to such a phenomenon?

Thank you for reading.

Yves Côté, son of Ti-Mick


Below is a link to When the Pipers Play.

Lyrics

I hear the voice, I hear the war
I hear the sound, on a distant shore
I feel the spirit of yesterday,
I touch the past, when the pipers play.
The pipes kept playing, for you and me
They kept on saying, we will soon be free
And your soul will never fade away
You’ll live forever, when the pipers play
The pibroch rears its deadly cry
Ah, some will live and some will die
And though they passed so far away
I feel their presence when the pipers play
The pipes kept playing, for you and me
They kept on saying, we will soon be free
And your soul will never fade away
You’ll live forever, when the pipers play
It speaks of love, I have lost
Its speaks of my eternal cost
It speaks the price of peace today
A price remembered, when the pipers play
We do remember when the pipers play
The pipes kept playing, for you and me
They kept on saying we will soon be free
And your soul will never fade away
You’ll live forever, when the pipers play
The pipes kept playing, for you and me
They kept on saying we will soon be free
And your soul will never fade away
You’ll live forever, when the pipers play
Source: Musixmatch

Les cornemuses qui font pleuvoir

Mis à jour le 19 mars 2022

Un certain synchronisme de temps entre ce qui se déroule sur le Vieux Continent et la Fête de la Saint-Patrick m’a poussé à proposer ce texte à Souvenirs de Guerre. Bien que cette fête ne soit pas celle des Écossais, qui est la Saint-André, du concours de l’immigration d’origine celte et des événements de l’histoire, il est devenu si traditionnel en Amérique du Nord d’y entendre les « cornemusiers » écossais que nul n’y voit de difficulté. D’ailleurs, Irlande et Écosse ne sont-ils pas deux pays celtes ?

Parmi les villes de ce continent ayant un défilé historique pour cette fête, depuis plus d’un siècle et demi Montréal se trouve en tête de liste. Dans la gaieté envahissante de la très populaire « Parade », les Montréalais lui attachent toutefois un sens très particulier : celui de l’arrivée imminente et tant espérée du printemps.

L’histoire vraie qui suit débuta en un jour devenu lointain de mon enfance, soit en 1964 ou en 1965 puisque j’avais moins de 10 ans. Tel on m’avait initié très tôt à la Fête Nationale du Québec, jour de la Saint-Jean Baptiste, on m’avait aussi donné précocement pour coutume d’être à la Parade de la Saint-Patrick. Avec un père qui selon ses mots avait « une grand-mère Hill, une mère O’Maley et un père qui jeune avait joué à la cross au Shamrock… », comment cela serait-il surprenant, je vous le demande ?

Le père en question c’était Ti-Mick, homme de service dans un garage, un chauffeur de taxi part-time et un Vétéran des Fusiliers Mont-Royal dont j’ai déjà un peu parlé dans ce blog. « Un peu » parce de lui et d’autres, il me reste encore beaucoup à dire.

Partis tous les deux ce matin-là en voiture, une vieille Chevrolet 1956 verte et blanche, toute en rondeurs de carrosserie, mais si rouillée qu’en m’y cognant un jour le tibia elle m’avait imprégné une cicatrice pour l’éternité, puisque la guérison n’efface pas pour autant les traces de chocs, faisant un pit stop à la Binerie, rendez-vous des chauffeurs de taxi qui pouvaient y manger quasiment à toute heure (on disait alors « la Binerie de la rue Mont-Royal » parce que se trouvant « sur Mont-Royal » dans un quartier ouvrier rempli d’enfants qui jouaient dehors et bien avant que par gentrification rentable pour eux, quelques spéculateurs inventent « Le Plateau » …), nous avions alors roulé jusqu’au centre-ville (de ce qui était encore la Métropole du Canada…) sous un ciel qui menaçait du pire. Une heure et demie après notre départ, rassasiés mais inquiets, nous nous trouvions donc enfin sur le lieu stratégique d’attente, en bordure du trottoir mais avec un brin de fatalité toute québécoise dans nos regards pour un temps qui ne s’annonçait pas au mieux. Ayant quitté la maison avec quelques petits degrés, route faite sous ciel épais et gris, nous nous préparions donc psychologiquement pour la suite sous climat d’Irlande et d’Écosse en hiver. Sauf que surprise !, notre attente en bordure de rue s’accompagna d’un changement de températures comme seule sans doute cette ville donne à connaître, que cela soit en positif comme en négatif par ailleurs. Et en une heure à peine, le temps prévu s’effaça comme par magie, faisant place à un temps de rêves…

Moi très heureux, les deux pieds bien posés sur le bord de la chaîne de trottoir et le dos bien appuyé sur le ventre de mon père pour attendre et lui, se trouvant tout juste derrière moi en me surpassant, nous n’avions plus donc qu’à participer au concours de qui sera le premier à voir de loin l’arrivée de la tête de cortège ? Et sous un pur soleil d’azur, nous avons donc assisté aux premiers allers-et-venus énergiques des éclaireurs d’avant-défilé et surtout, avons enfin commencé à entendre le son plaintif et émouvant des cornemuses des Black Watch. Ce que je savais pour moi et mon paternel vouloir dire.

La consigne que mon père avait établie était qu’au passage des hommes de ce régiment, j’avais à me tenir parfaitement droit, tête haute en silence et quoi qu’il arrive, de ne pas bouger d’un cil parce que lui au même moment, il devait faire le plus beau salut militaire que possible. Le message donné par nous comme en symbole m’était connu comme très important. « Pendant la guerre, les Fusiliers et les Black Watch nous avons plusieurs fois combattu côte à côte pour faire reculer l’armée d’Hitler. Et que jamais aucun des deux n’avait abandonné… » me rappelait-il à chaque fois. Y ajoutant cette année-là « qu’il aurait aussi pu s’enrôler dans les Black Watch et qu’il avait finalement choisi les Fusiliers parce que sa langue est le français ». En somme, toutes choses donnant ainsi à penser à l’enfant que j’étais que dans les circonstances, il ne pouvait être que normal que les cornemuses me procurent l’émotion qu’elles me donnaient. Surtout que pour moi, en plus les tambours du régiment résonnaient comme ceux de notre ancienne Compagnie franche de la Marine qu’on allait voir en plein été au Fort de l’Île Saint-Hélène…

Lorsque la musique passa devant nous, bien sûr je fis ce que je dus. Sauf que soudainement une surprenante sensation me vint. Toc, toc, toc sur ma tête comme trois gouttes de pluie. « Mais il ne pleut pas ! Est-ce que ça viendrait pas peut-être d’un moineau ? », me suis-je dit sans bouger et en balayant le ciel des yeux, gauche-droite. Aussitôt les cornemuses passées, je me touchai le dessus de la tête pour voir de quoi il pouvait s’agir. Non ce n’était pas le largage de quelques cadeaux d’oiseaux et donc, ce ne pouvait être que de l’eau. Mon père me regardant faire, je lui demandai s’il n’avait pas reçu des gouttes lui aussi ? Et il se contenta de me dire que peut-être, mais qu’il n’en avait pas fait de cas parce qu’il était parfaitement à l’attention pour honorer les Black Watch qui passaient. Un peu moqueur, il ajouta que je serais mieux de revenir au défilé parce que si je manquais de le faire, j’aurais à attendre longtemps pour le suivant…

Le reste du défilé se déroula des plus chaudement, comme vous l’imaginez, mais au retour l’affaire me semblait quand même plutôt trop nébuleuse. Je m’enquis auprès de mon père pour savoir s’il avait déjà vu un phénomène météo comme celui-là et là, venant probablement de ces racines écossaises et irlandaises qui lui donnaient à communiquer avec elfes et farfadets, il me répondit « Tu sais, il arrive que certaines cornemuses fassent pleuvoir sans que personne puisse y comprendre quelque chose. Mais bon, ça n’arrive tellement pas souvent qu’on peut considérer une grande chance d’être personnellement touché. »

J’avais huit ou tout au plus neuf ans, l’affaire devint une certitude. Pendant quelques années, je me sentis le plus chanceux de tous d’avoir trouvé mon petit bonheur. Mais en réalité, ce ne fut là que l’amorce d’une histoire qui dura des décennies.

L’année suivante je crois, c’est aux côtés de ce Ti-Mick que j’appelais Daddy que je vis pour la première fois un film de 1962 qui allait vite devenir un des films de guerre et en particulier, du cinéma américain : Le Jour le plus long (la version française de The Longest Day). Et vous le savez sans aucun doute, l’un des événements qui y furent romancés est la traversée du Pont de Bénouville en Normandie (au nom de code allié Pegasus Bridge ) par Lord Lovat et son « cornemusier » (né à Régina en 1922), Bill Millin.

 

 

La chose me paraissant une pure fantaisie, exactement du genre de celles que je savais déjà les États-uniens capables d’inventer, mon père m’expliqua sans trop s’étendre que malgré quelques petits détails, cela s’était bel et bien déroulé. Et qu’il arrivait assez souvent en guerre que la réalité soit plus incroyable que la fiction et qu’il pourrait me donner des dizaines d’exemples de ce genre de choses. Et qu’un jour, lorsque je serais plus vieux, on en reparlerait peut-être si cela m’intéressait encore.

Le temps passa ensuite trop vite et un soir de 1983, Ti-Mick partit rejoindre beaucoup des ses amis de vingt ans. Pour ses funérailles, très modestes je vous l’assure, un de ses frères d’armes avec qui il était resta proche toute sa vie, monsieur Arthur Fraser, me demanda si j’avais l’idée de faire entendre un peu de cornemuse à l’église. Je lui répondis qu’il avait une bonne idée, que j’avais un lecteur de cassettes pour le faire et que j’en parlerais donc au prêtre. Je demandai alors au Vétéran en question s’il n’avait pas une suggestion à me faire pour le morceau, puisqu’il était d’origine écossaise. Il me proposa ensuite « When the pipers play ». Il est inutile que je vous en dise plus sinon que si vous n’en connaissez rien de ses paroles, je vous suggère de les lire et vous comprendrez le reste.

Et la vie poursuivit son cours, ce qui me donna un jour de partir habiter en France. Depuis lors, tous les deux ou trois ans mon épouse et moi allons aux commémorations en Normandie où nous nous sommes fait des amis. Et là, un jour de commémoration à Dieppe, il m’a été donné d’apprendre deux faits historiques. Le premier, que le 19 août 1942 (la page la plus sanglante de l’histoire de l’armée canadienne), un détachement des Black Watch était du nombre qui a débarqué (dont les Fusiliers Mont-Royal) et que ceux qui n’y furent pas tués, devinrent prisonniers de guerre.

Et le deuxième, que la libération de la ville en 1944 fut réalisée par les mêmes régiments qui étaient à l’assaut deux ans plus tôt et qu’alors, les deux régiments de Montréal non seulement défilèrent ensemble sous les applaudissements et les fleurs de ses habitants, mais que les Black Watch se postèrent en garde d’honneur pour saluer les autres régiments à la cornemuse, dont celui des Fusiliers bien entendu.

Et comme si cela ne suffisait pas déjà en signification pour Ti-Mick, un mois après que ces deux régiments d’infanterie se soient battus côte-à-côte et aient été décimées au sud de Caen, en faisant face à ce qui est toujours identifiée aujourd’hui comme la plus puissante division blindée allemande de la Seconde Guerre mondiale, la 12e Panzerdivision SS Hitlerjugend de Kurt Meyer (surnommé Panzermeyer, soit « Meyer le blindé »).

Voilà donc amis/es lecteurs et lectrices, ici la fin de mon histoire au sujet d’une certaine Parade de la Saint-Patrick de mon enfance à Montréal au milieu des années 60. Voici surtout comment il me fut donné de comprendre peu à peu les larmes échappées par mon père ce jour-là.

Vous dites? C’est donc qu’à 65 ans je crois enfin plus ni aux Elfes, ni aux Farfadets?

Ah non, je n’ai pas dit cela. Détrompez-vous parce qu’en un jour de commémoration à Bénouville, sans le prévoir mon épouse Isabelle nous nous sommes retrouvés arrêtés en plein milieu d’un pont à entendre venir des cornemuses.

Et nous pouvons en témoigner maintenant avec conviction, Ti-Mick avait bel et bien été conseillé par ces entités mystérieuses pour dire la vérité au sujet de ces instruments de musique.

Parce que le temps d’attraper l’appareil photo pour prendre le cliché qui suit, de manière tout à fait inattendue et alors qu’il faisait parfaitement soleil, soudainement il se mit à pleuvoir dans la voiture.

Alors qui sait si un de ces quatre, vous-mêmes ne serez pas témoin d’un tel phénomène?

Merci à vous de m’avoir lu ici !

Yves Côté, fils de Ti-Mick


Ci-dessous un lien vers When the Pipers Play.

Paroles

I hear the voice, I hear the war
I hear the sound, on a distant shore
I feel the spirit of yesterday,
I touch the past, when the pipers play.

The pipes kept playing, for you and me
They kept on saying, we will soon be free
And your soul will never fade away
You’ll live forever, when the pipers play

The pibroch rears its deadly cry
Ah, some will live and some will die
And though they passed so far away
I feel their presence when the pipers play

The pipes kept playing, for you and me
They kept on saying, we will soon be free
And your soul will never fade away
You’ll live forever, when the pipers play

It speaks of love, I have lost
Its speaks of my eternal cost
It speaks the price of peace today
A price remembered, when the pipers play
We do remember when the pipers play

The pipes kept playing, for you and me
They kept on saying we will soon be free
And your soul will never fade away
You’ll live forever, when the pipers play

The pipes kept playing, for you and me
They kept on saying we will soon be free
And your soul will never fade away
You’ll live forever, when the pipers play

Source: Musixmatch

Georges-Henri Moffatt

Mis à jour le 14 mars 2022 avec cette correction de Bernard Moffatt

L’avion dans lequel prenait place mon père était le KG367, chalk number 304 (d’où l’appellation CN304). L’équipage était composé des Wing Officers Cuer et Anderson et du Flight Sergeant Sylvester et du sergent Butler. Il a décollé de Down Ampney à 23h30 le 5 juin 1944 et est retourné à la base à 3h15 le 6 juin 44. D’après Ludovic, plusieurs membres de l’équipage ont été tué plus tard en 1944 lors de l’opération Market Garden sur Arnhem. L’appareil devait ressembler pas mal à celui que vous me montrez mais avec une livrée différente. Fait surprenant, plusieurs DC-3 de cette époque volent encore aujourd’hui… Voir fichier pdf ci-joint qui m’a été fourni par Ludovic Louis. Ci-joint également une photo d’un Dakota aux couleurs de la RAF

Bonne journée


Douze ans plus tard.

Voir à la fin.


Billet original

J’avais écrit une série de billets sur les frères Rousseau de Montmagny.

1944 Maurice RousseauTombe provisoire de PhilippeRousseau

Philippe Rousseau parachutiste 1

Philippe Rousseau

Maurice Rousseau

Maurice Rousseau

Pauline Philippe et Marie Rousseau

famille de Lacasse Rousseau et Gabrielle Fafard

Ce qui suit a été écrit en  2010 et commémore le souvenir de Philippe Rousseau.

Je voulais l’éditer, car il comportait quelques erreurs. C’était avant le commentaire de Marie Madeleine qui a découvert un des billets sur Philippe Rousseau. Elle m’a laissé ce commentaire des plus touchants…

Bonjour je suis très touchée par vos récits je suis originaire de Douville en Auge et ma mère bientôt âgée de 81 ans était à Douville aussi avec sa famille. Elle se rappelle bien de ce qui s’est passé au moment du 6 juin 1944 avec les Canadiens. C’était non loin de Gonneville-sur-Mer et Grangues. C’était au lieu dit la maison blanche sur la commune de Douville en Auge, d’ailleurs aujourd’hui 7 juin 2014 je vais me rendre à Gonnevile-sur-Mer déposer des fleurs devant la plaque de ces soldats à qui nous devons la liberté. Je suis âgée de 38 ans et avant c’était mon père qui déposait des fleurs. Il est décédé l’année dernière. Donc à moi sa fille de faire un geste pour ces soldats.

Voici donc en rappel ce qui devait être mon dernier article sur Philippe Rousseau.


Dernier article sur le lieutenant Philippe Rousseau, héros inconnu ou méconnu, je ne sais plus trop…

« Blessent mon coeur d’une langueur monotone… »

C’est le signal qui annonçait à la Résistance l’imminence du débarquement de Normandie…

On s’était quitté comme ceci lundi dernier…

Alors que ses hommes tentaient aussi bien que mal de se regrouper, le lieutenant Rousseau menait à bien la mission secrète qui lui avait été confiée, tout comme à deux autres hommes, l’ordonnance James George Broadfoot et le Caporal Boyd Anderson.

Le caporal Anderson explique ainsi leur mission :

[Traduction]

Le lieutenant Rousseau nous expliqua que la ville de Dozulé se trouvait à environ une dizaine de milles de notre zone de parachutage. Nos services de renseignements ne savaient que très peu de choses de cette commune. Elle était située sur une route principale menant vers la ville de Caen. Le nom du maire de Dozulé s’appelait aussi Rousseau, le même que mon officier. On pensait que le maire était sympathique à notre cause.

Le plan consistait à ce que le lieutenant Rousseau, l’ordonnance Broadfoot, et moi-même nous nous rejoignions le plus rapidement possible dans la zone de parachutage. Nous devions éviter tout combat et nous rendre immédiatement par quelque moyen que ce soit à Dozulé pour trouver le maire Rousseau. Par la suite, nous devions lui parler dans l’espoir de gagner sa confiance afin de savoir la position des troupes allemandes dans la région.

Le lieutenant Rousseau était très enthousiasmé à l’idée de cette mission, tout comme moi d’ailleurs, tout heureux d’avoir été choisi pour cette mission tâche dangereuse mais inhabituelle. Comme le lieutenant Rousseau, j’étais motivé pour la mener à bien. Ce que je ne savais pas par contre, c’est que lors de la première journée, le lieutenant serait tué aux premières lueurs du jour et que Broadfoot giserait mort dans le fossé l’après-midi suivant à quelques pieds derrière la haie où je me trouverais.

(Boys of the Cloud)


Ayant sauté en dernier de l’avion, le lieutenant Rousseau ne trouva que quatre de ses hommes, et il n’arriva à retrouver ni le soldat Broadfoot, ni le caporal Anderson. Il se dirigea immédiatement vers la maison la plus proche pour prendre des repères, et il s’aperçut en parlant avec ses habitants qu’il avait été parachuté à plus de vingt kilomètres à l’est de son objectif.

Cela ne le démina pourtant pas puisqu’il avait été parachuté plus près de son objectif que prévu. Le lieutenant pris alors immédiatement la direction de Dozulé pour remplir sa mission accompagné des soldats rencontrés.

Deux heures plus tard, les cinq hommes furent pris dans un feu croisé avec des soldats allemands et le lieutenant Rousseau et le soldat Oxtoby périrent sur le coup.

« Il est très possible que si le lieutenant Rousseau avait pris sa place dans le rang comme l’aurait fait tout autre officier, il n’eut pas été tué, mais comme d’habitude, il prenait soin de ses hommes avant tout et marchait à la tête de la petite troupe » raconte le soldat Irwin Willsey.

Les balles atteignirent les grenades à phosphore que portait le lieutenant Rousseau à sa ceinture et celles-ci s’enflammèrent.

Toutefois, les opinions divergent à savoir s’ils périrent des brûlures ou des tirs ennemis. Deux des soldats les accompagnant réussirent à s’en tirer indemnes, alors que le troisième fut blessé et fait prisonnier peu après.

Le lieutenant Rousseau était, je le répète un vrai soldat, un homme d’honneur, discipliné et je suis convaincu qu’il fit le maximum pour mener à bien sa mission sur Dozulé. S’il n’avait pas eu cet ordre, il serait resté dans les parages dans le but de retrouver le reste du groupe.

Caporal Anderson (Gonneville-sur-Mer 1939-1944)

D’après mes recherches, il n’est donc pas certain si le lieutenant Rousseau a réussi à accomplir sa mission.

Comment le caporal Broadfoot l’a-t-il su ?

 


Selon le caporal Anderson, Philippe Rousseau serait mort le 6 juin, mais il n’était plus avec lui, car ils avaient été séparés lors du parachutage. J’ai poursuivi mes recherches et j’ai trouvé un site Internet. C’est celui de la commune de Dozulé en France, et une de leurs sections est dévouée à Dozulé et la guerre.

J’y ai trouvé cette page…


J’ai écrit deux fois à la mairie, mais je n’ai pas encore eu de réponse. Je cherche aussi en entrer en contact avec la jeune guide pour valider toute l’histoire de la mort de Philippe Rousseau. De qui tient-elle toutes ses informations? Je n’ai pas encore eu de réponse.

Fin du billet…

À suivre?


Mis à jour le 11 mars 2020 avec ceci…

le troisième fut blessé et fait prisonnier peu après.

Le troisième parachutiste était Georges-Henri Moffatt…

Cliquez ci-dessous pour lire l’hommage écrit par son fils Bernard.

Georges-Henri Moffatt 

Pauline Rousseau, Georges-Henri Moffatt et Marie Rousseau (1946)

Les frères Rousseau

Douze ans plus tard.

Voir à la fin.


Billet original

J’avais écrit une série de billets sur les frères Rousseau de Montmagny.

1944 Maurice RousseauTombe provisoire de PhilippeRousseau

Philippe Rousseau parachutiste 1

Philippe Rousseau

Maurice Rousseau

Maurice Rousseau

Pauline Philippe et Marie Rousseau

famille de Lacasse Rousseau et Gabrielle Fafard

Ce qui suit a été écrit en  2010 et commémore le souvenir de Philippe Rousseau.

Je voulais l’éditer, car il comportait quelques erreurs. C’était avant le commentaire de Marie Madeleine qui a découvert un des billets sur Philippe Rousseau. Elle m’a laissé ce commentaire des plus touchants…

Bonjour je suis très touchée par vos récits je suis originaire de Douville en Auge et ma mère bientôt âgée de 81 ans était à Douville aussi avec sa famille. Elle se rappelle bien de ce qui s’est passé au moment du 6 juin 1944 avec les Canadiens. C’était non loin de Gonneville-sur-Mer et Grangues. C’était au lieu dit la maison blanche sur la commune de Douville en Auge, d’ailleurs aujourd’hui 7 juin 2014 je vais me rendre à Gonnevile-sur-Mer déposer des fleurs devant la plaque de ces soldats à qui nous devons la liberté. Je suis âgée de 38 ans et avant c’était mon père qui déposait des fleurs. Il est décédé l’année dernière. Donc à moi sa fille de faire un geste pour ces soldats.

Voici donc en rappel ce qui devait être mon dernier article sur Philippe Rousseau.


Dernier article sur le lieutenant Philippe Rousseau, héros inconnu ou méconnu, je ne sais plus trop…

« Blessent mon coeur d’une langueur monotone… »

C’est le signal qui annonçait à la Résistance l’imminence du débarquement de Normandie…

On s’était quitté comme ceci lundi dernier…

Alors que ses hommes tentaient aussi bien que mal de se regrouper, le lieutenant Rousseau menait à bien la mission secrète qui lui avait été confiée, tout comme à deux autres hommes, l’ordonnance James George Broadfoot et le Caporal Boyd Anderson.

Le caporal Anderson explique ainsi leur mission :

[Traduction]

Le lieutenant Rousseau nous expliqua que la ville de Dozulé se trouvait à environ une dizaine de milles de notre zone de parachutage. Nos services de renseignements ne savaient que très peu de choses de cette commune. Elle était située sur une route principale menant vers la ville de Caen. Le nom du maire de Dozulé s’appelait aussi Rousseau, le même que mon officier. On pensait que le maire était sympathique à notre cause.

Le plan consistait à ce que le lieutenant Rousseau, l’ordonnance Broadfoot, et moi-même nous nous rejoignions le plus rapidement possible dans la zone de parachutage. Nous devions éviter tout combat et nous rendre immédiatement par quelque moyen que ce soit à Dozulé pour trouver le maire Rousseau. Par la suite, nous devions lui parler dans l’espoir de gagner sa confiance afin de savoir la position des troupes allemandes dans la région.

Le lieutenant Rousseau était très enthousiasmé à l’idée de cette mission, tout comme moi d’ailleurs, tout heureux d’avoir été choisi pour cette mission tâche dangereuse mais inhabituelle. Comme le lieutenant Rousseau, j’étais motivé pour la mener à bien. Ce que je ne savais pas par contre, c’est que lors de la première journée, le lieutenant serait tué aux premières lueurs du jour et que Broadfoot giserait mort dans le fossé l’après-midi suivant à quelques pieds derrière la haie où je me trouverais.

(Boys of the Cloud)


Ayant sauté en dernier de l’avion, le lieutenant Rousseau ne trouva que quatre de ses hommes, et il n’arriva à retrouver ni le soldat Broadfoot, ni le caporal Anderson. Il se dirigea immédiatement vers la maison la plus proche pour prendre des repères, et il s’aperçut en parlant avec ses habitants qu’il avait été parachuté à plus de vingt kilomètres à l’est de son objectif.

Cela ne le démina pourtant pas puisqu’il avait été parachuté plus près de son objectif que prévu. Le lieutenant pris alors immédiatement la direction de Dozulé pour remplir sa mission accompagné des soldats rencontrés.

Deux heures plus tard, les cinq hommes furent pris dans un feu croisé avec des soldats allemands et le lieutenant Rousseau et le soldat Oxtoby périrent sur le coup.

« Il est très possible que si le lieutenant Rousseau avait pris sa place dans le rang comme l’aurait fait tout autre officier, il n’eut pas été tué, mais comme d’habitude, il prenait soin de ses hommes avant tout et marchait à la tête de la petite troupe » raconte le soldat Irwin Willsey.

Les balles atteignirent les grenades à phosphore que portait le lieutenant Rousseau à sa ceinture et celles-ci s’enflammèrent.

Toutefois, les opinions divergent à savoir s’ils périrent des brulures ou des tirs ennemis. Deux des soldats les accompagnant réussirent à s’en tirer indemnes, alors que le troisième fut blessé et fait prisonnier peu après.

Le lieutenant Rousseau était, je le répète un vrai soldat, un homme d’honneur, discipliné et je suis convaincu qu’il fit le maximum pour mener à bien sa mission sur Dozulé. S’il n’avait pas eu cet ordre, il serait resté dans les parages dans le but de retrouver le reste du groupe.

Caporal Anderson (Gonneville-sur-Mer 1939-1944)

D’après mes recherches, il n’est donc pas certain si le lieutenant Rousseau a réussi à accomplir sa mission.

Comment le caporal Broadfoot l’a-t-il su ?

 


Selon le caporal Anderson, Philippe Rousseau serait mort le 6 juin, mais il n’était plus avec lui, car ils avaient été séparés lors du parachutage. J’ai poursuivi mes recherches et j’ai trouvé un site Internet. C’est celui de la commune de Dozulé en France, et une de leurs sections est dévouée à Dozulé et la guerre.

J’y ai trouvé cette page…


J’ai écrit deux fois à la mairie, mais je n’ai pas encore eu de réponse. Je cherche aussi en entrer en contact avec la jeune guide pour valider toute l’histoire de la mort de Philippe Rousseau. De qui tient-elle toutes ses informations? Je n’ai pas encore eu de réponse.

Fin du billet…

À suivre?


Mis à jour le 9 mars 2020 avec ceci…

Hi there,

I wanted to thank you for the great page you have so kindly dedicated to my great uncles Philippe and Maurice Rousseau.

I grew up hearing their valiant stories which always remain with me.

Regarding the picture in which you originally believed to be Philippe (with his 2 sisters) was actually a soldier in Philippe’s division called Moffat (I have never seen the name spelled and I do not know much about him)

After Philippe was killed and the fighting died down, the rest of the platoon was captured including Mr. Moffat. He came by the family residence to tell the story of Philippe.

Interesting tidbit, Moffat and the rest of the platoon were moved to a prison camp in the mountains where they remained for quite some time. One of the German guards was looking for a skiing buddy and Moffat was his man. He spent a portion of his internment skiing. The German officer did say that if he tried to escape, he would be shot. Nevertheless, Mr. Moffat was able to tell our family of the heroism of Philippe.

The story I had been told was that Philippe’s battalion had been dropped at the wrong place. All of the soldiers were frightened as they eventually figured they were behind enemy lines. Philippe insisted on leading the platoon. That is when a German ambush killed him. 

With regards to Maurice, I have heard various accounts of what had happened. His mission was to meet up with a Maquis agent also named Rousseau who would have been a distant relative. They never had the chance to meet as the Maquis agent had already been killed by the time Maurice arrived.

The story about the priest showing the room to the German soldiers, I had been told that Maurice was hiding behind the door that the priest had just opened. He had his knife in hand. The Germans had checked several rooms and had asked about the one that Maurice would be in. The priest insisted on showing the Germans the room in question. Due to the instance of the priest, the Germans only took a peek inside the room instead of the more thorough verifications that had been done in other rooms.

In any event, I heard that Maurice died while providing cover to other allied soldiers. Another story I heard was that he did not die  but was wounded and captured. He would have been likely tortured for info and would have been executed as part of Hitler’s “Commando order”. However, I do not know if this is true, just what I have heard and read.

On a side note, both men were against the draft as they thought no-one should be forced to go to war. They were volunteers.

In any event, it is nice to see these young brave men remembered and honored. Me and my family truly appreciate this.

Have a wonderful day.

Best regards,

Daniel


Hi Pierre,

Thank you for your response.

No credit is needed, but you can if you want.

How would I find your blog, I just stumbled on your web page when looking up my great uncles?

In any event, I attached a picture of Philippe with my mom and uncle. While there is no year for the picture, this I am told, may have been one of the last times that my mom would have seen her uncle. I have been told that this may have been taken shortly before Philippe’s final departure to Europe.

Last tid-bit;

My mom remembers waking up one morning to find her dad (Philippe’s older brother Jacques) crying. He was holding 2 letters, which would have been from the military. The 1st letter was the news that Philippe had been killed in combat. The 2nd letter stating that Maurice was missing and the worst was feared. My poor grandfather found out that he lost 2 brothers in a single day. It was one of the most striking moments of my mom’s life as my grandfather was not at all prone to publicly emoting.

Among my mom’s things are the silver “Airborne” division wings pin. This was one of my mom’s most precious belongings. 

Again, thank you for your work 

Have a fantastic day.

Kindest regards,

Daniel

Les souvenirs de guerre d’une petite Française

Nous sommes en octobre 2000.

Avec l’aimable contribution de Jacques Picard, vu ci-dessous avec Denise Chalaux et John Slaney.

John Slaney, l’ancien pilote de Typhoon qui le 15 juin 1944 avait sauté en parachute au dessus de Danvou-la-Ferrière, a retrouvé dimanche Denise Chalaux, la petite Française qui avait offert de le cacher. Ils ne s’étaient jamais revus. Lundi, Denise a emmené John sur les lieux de leur première rencontre (notre photo). Les recherches continuent pour tenter de retrouver les débris de l’avion qui a pu s’écraser dans le bois de la Ferrière-du-Val…

La prochaine fois, vous en saurez plus sur l’histoire de ce pilote.

Je me souviens aussi parfaitement de lui. Nous avons eu l’honneur de l’accueillir dans notre petit village de Danvou-la-Ferrière où il est venu sur les lieux de son crash et a pu rencontrer la jeune fille qui l’avait hébergé 56 ans auparavant. Nous nous sommes aussi rendus avec lui au château où se trouvaient les SS et où il fut retenu. Il me semble qu’il était accompagné de son fils Patrick. C’était en octobre 2000.

Jacques Picard

 

Une demande – Le début de l’histoire – La suite à venir… la fin

Une demande – Le début de l’histoire – La suite à venir… la fin

Micka avait finalement trouvé le nom du pilote et encore beaucoup plus.

C’est le cœur chaud que je confirme (avec Pierre) avoir trouvé l’identité d’Anthony. Keith Janes  d’escapelines et Daniel Carville de francecrashes 39-45 ont été aussi des aides très précieuses.

Merci à vous !

Voici une photo du P/O Anthony Vernon Hargreaves de Montréal devant un Spitfire Mk IX. Elle vient de la collection de sa famille.

wp-1635331928842

Anthony Hargreaves était le pilote du Mustang III FB107 du 122 Squadron qui s’est écrasé le 25 juillet 1944 dans l’Eure à côté de Saint-André-de-l’Eure (non à Dreux comme décrit sur son dossier). Une autre histoire commence maintenant, car je suis en contact avec son fils et sa fille. Beaucoup d’émotions et un projet de rencontre en Normandie en 2022 !

Il n’y aura pas de suite finalement, juste cette colorisation d’une photo en noir et blanc.

Anthony Hargreaves (1)

Il n’y aura probablement pas de suite à mon hommage à Gaston Lamirande, mais cela vaut tout de même la peine d’essayer.

Le 7 décembre 1944, le sergent Gaston Lamirande arrive à l’escadrille 222 de la RAF.

Une demande – Le début de l’histoire – La suite à venir…

Une demande – Le début de l’histoire – La suite à venir…

Micka a trouvé le nom du pilote et encore plus.

C’est le cœur chaud que je confirme (avec Pierre) avoir trouvé l’identité d’Anthony. Keith Janes  d’escapelines et Daniel Carville de francecrashes 39-45 ont été aussi des aides très précieuses. 

Merci à vous !

Voici une photo du P/O Anthony Vernon Hargreaves de Montréal devant un Spitfire Mk IX. Elle vient de la collection de sa famille.

wp-1635331928842

Anthony Hargreaves était le pilote du Mustang III FB107 du 122 Squadron qui s’est écrasé le 25 juillet 1944 dans l’Eure à côté de Saint-André-de-l’Eure (non à Dreux comme décrit sur son dossier). Une autre histoire commence maintenant, car je suis en contact avec son fils et sa fille. Beaucoup d’émotions et un projet de rencontre en Normandie en 2022 ! 

À suivre donc ! 

Autres billets reliés à cette recherche

Une demande

Une demande – Le début de l’histoire

Une demande – Le début de l’histoire – Trouvé! À suivre…

Anthony Hargreaves (1)